Monday, September 2, 2013

Review(sort of): Some Quiet Place by Kelsey Sutton



I can’t weep. I can’t fear. I’ve grown talented at pretending.

Elizabeth Caldwell doesn’t feel emotions . . . she sees them. Longing, Shame, and Courage materialize around her classmates. Fury and Resentment appear in her dysfunctional home. They’ve all given up on Elizabeth because she doesn’t succumb to their touch. All, that is, save one—Fear. He’s intrigued by her, as desperate to understand the accident that changed Elizabeth’s life as she is herself.

Elizabeth and Fear both sense that the key to her past is hidden in the dream paintings she hides in the family barn. But a shadowy menace has begun to stalk her, and try as she might, Elizabeth can barely avoid the brutality of her life long enough to uncover the truth about herself. When it matters most, will she be able to rely on Fear to save her?


I’m trying to think of a way to write a review that will do this book justice and be balanced as well. Honestly, after spending an eternity thinking how to, I still can’t. The best compliment I can give it is to say that this is one of those books I wish I’d written myself.  

Kelsey's writing is gorgeous and the ways she tackled Elizabeth as an emotionless character was brutal and delicate at the same time. Her interaction with the men in this novel is something that I loved watching as well. It's explosive in its everything and nothing. There is nothing soft or apologetic about it. I appreciated how she handled Elizabeth's relationship with Fear as well, and the futileness of what was happing at home. The only thing I would have liked was more from Joshua, a bigger role in the happenings or just for him to have had more of an impact. But it's not even that important.

This is such a unique concept and I'm am putting Some Quiet Place as one of my top 10 books of the year. It was an excellent read and I will definitely reread this before the second book is released.

Add it on Goodreads.
Kelsey Sutton's blog and Twitter.

Big thank you to Flux Books and NetGalley for the review copy.

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